Harry claims to have ‘killed 25 gunmen’ in Afghanistan.

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Harry boasted of his “trophy” of killing 25 Taliban fighters while fighting in Afghanistan and talked about the “lost life” in his upcoming autobiography.

Harry was revealed to have flown six combat missions as an Apache combat helicopter pilot while deployed to Afghanistan between 2012 and 2013. Britain’s Telegraph newspaper quoted the Duke of Sussex as telling in his autobiography. Spare launches next week.

The newspaper had a Spanish-language version of the book, which was mistakenly sold on the shelves before it was withdrawn.

In the book, Harry brags that he has killed many Taliban fighters during the war. “My number is 25. It’s not a number that pleases me, but it doesn’t embarrass me either,” he wrote, describing killing the gunmen “like removing a piece from a chessboard.” 

Harry, 38, served ten years in the British Army and was promoted to captain. He was deployed twice to Afghanistan, first as a front-line military air traffic controller coordinating airstrikes between 2007-2008 and second as a combat helicopter pilot.

Harry’s first deployment to Afghanistan was strictly confidential for security reasons. He was forced to return home when a foreign newspaper revealed that he was participating in the war here. The British Ministry of Defense has not commented on the information.

In his memoirs, Harry also admitted to using cocaine at the age of 17 but said that “it was not very fun” British TV channel Sky News quoted content from a book they obtained.

“Of course, I used cocaine at the time during a weekend of hunting. I used a little more later on,” Harry wrote. “The experience wasn’t very fun, but it made me feel different.”

Harry’s father, Prince Charles, who is now King Charles III, once took him to a drug rehabilitation center to meet addicts there after discovering his son was underage drinking and smoking marijuana.

Harry also told in his autobiography about his experience of “losing his life” with an elderly woman, Page Six reported. Afghanistan, as well as talking about the “lost life” in his upcoming autobiography.

Harry was revealed to have flown six combat missions as an Apache combat helicopter pilot while deployed to Afghanistan between 2012 and 2013, Britain’s Telegraph newspaper quoted the Duke of Sussex as telling in his autobiography. Spare launches next week.

The newspaper had a Spanish-language version of the book, which was mistakenly sold on the shelves before it was withdrawn.

In the book, Harry brags that he has killed many Taliban fighters during the war. “My number is 25. It’s not a number that pleases me, but it doesn’t embarrass me either,” he wrote, describing killing the gunmen “like removing a piece from a chessboard.”. “

Harry, 38, served ten years in the British Army and was promoted to captain. He was deployed twice to Afghanistan, first as a front-line military air traffic controller coordinating airstrikes between 2007-2008 and second as a combat helicopter pilot.

Harry’s first deployment to Afghanistan was strictly confidential for security reasons. He was forced to return home when a foreign newspaper revealed that he was participating in the war here.

The British Ministry of Defense has not commented on the information. In his memoirs, Harry also admitted to using cocaine at the age of 17 but said that “it was not very fun” British TV channel Sky News quoted content from a book they obtained.

“Of course, I used cocaine at the time during a weekend of hunting. I used a little more later on,” Harry wrote. “The experience wasn’t very fun, but it made me feel different.”

Harry’s father, Prince Charles, who is now King Charles III, once took him to a drug rehabilitation center to meet addicts there after discovering his son was underage drinking and smoking marijuana.

Harry also told in his autobiography about his experience of “losing his life” with an elderly woman, Page Six reported.

“It’s nothing short of glorious,” the Duke of Sussex wrote. “It happened on the lawn behind a crowded pub. She was very fond of horses and treated me like a pony.” Harry did not name the woman.

Spare, the autobiographical title, comes from an old adage in the British royal and aristocratic circles that the eldest son is the heir to title, power, and fortune, so the second son will be the backup. 

Suppose the eldest child is in trouble. The book is expected to cause great outrage among the British royal family. Buckingham Palace declined to comment on the information Harry made in the book.

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