Armenia may replace its arsenal of russian Iskander with Indian-made Pralay ballistic missiles

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Armenia may replace its arsenal of russian Iskander with Indian-made Pralay ballistic missiles. According to some news reports, Armenia has shown interest in Indian-made loitering munitions and in India’s Pralay, a canisterised tactical, surface-to-surface short-range missile. Earlier, Armenia has decided to buy Indian-made Pinaka Multi-Barrel Rocket Launcher Systems. Previously, Armenia has placed orders for Swathi Weapon Locating Radar Systems.

After the Nagorno-Karabakh conflict, between Armenia and Azerbaijan, Armenian PM Nikol Pashinyan said that Russian-made Iskander ballistic missiles did not explode during the war and also these missiles has very low accuracy.

Armenian PM claimed that Russian missiles did not worked properly.

The Indian-made Pralay is the indian alternative of Dongfeng 12 (CSS-X-15), 9K720 Iskander and Hyunmoo 2 missile.

Powered by solid fuel rocket motor, the missile follows quasi-ballistic trajectory and able to perform mid-air maneuvers using maneuverable reentry vehicle (MaRV) to defeat anti-ballistic missile (ABM) interceptors.

Pralay uses the same composite propellant developed by High Energy Materials Research Laboratory (HEMRL) for Sagarika from K Missile family. The composite propellant is highly efficient and generates more energy compare to propellant used in Agni missile series.

Pralay carries 350 kg to 700 kg high explosive preformed fragmentation warhead, Penetration-Cum-Blast (PCB) and Runway Denial Penetration Submunition (RDPS) at a range of 150 km to 500 km. Pralay is designed to target radar and communication installations, command and control centers and advance airfields using conventional warhead.

The system is road mobile and meets the tactical ballistic missile requirement of the Indian Army. Pralay fills the gap of a conventionally armed ballistic missile that is not hampered by ‘No First Use’ nuclear policy.

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